Take a trip to Walmart to Help Your Child Learn Number Sense

Reluctant math learner?

5 tips to get your reluctant learner excited about math %283%29

Got a reluctant math student? Turn your child that shies away from math into one who asks to do math activities! Download your free tip sheet today.

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit

Help Your Child Learn Number Sense by Taking a Trip to Walmart

There are simple things you can do to help your child gain a better number sense.  Having a good number sense includes things such as knowing the position of a number on the number line and also understanding the size of numbers relative to other numbers.  I am a proponent of introducing the number line to a child at a very early age.  Being able to locate numbers on the number line is CRITICAL to becoming a “math ninja.”  This skill will aid your child in being better able to understand math as the numbers won’t seem so foreign. For example, a child should know that 1/4 is between 0 and 1 (but closer to 0), that -3/2 is between -2 and -1 (halfway between them), or that 9.8 is between 9 and 10 (but closer to 10).  Another example is a child should know that 10 is twice as large as 5, or that 100 is 4 times as large as 25.

Developing Number Sense for Elementary Kids

I have already introduced my 5 year old (he’s almost 6) who is in the 1st grade to the number line.  He even does a pretty good job recreating the number line with the integers placed on it.  I have taught him  that the farther to the right a number is on the number line, the bigger it is, so he knows for example that -1 is larger than -2.

My daughter is 9 years old and in the 4th grade, and she too can draw the number line.  To help her gain more number sense, I will have her locate different improper fractions on the number line.  So first she changes them to mixed numbers, and then shows their locations on the number line.

Developing Number Sense: Locating Numbers on the Number Line

As a young child, however, Andre` does not have a good sense of the amount of dollars it takes to purchase different items.  To help him gain a better understanding of how much money it takes to purchase different items we took a trip to Walmart, as I needed to do some grocery shopping anyway.  He went armed with his notepad and a pencil. As we walked around the store, I would write down the names of different items, and I had him copy their prices.  I wanted him to see for example what $1 would buy you versus something that was close to $5.  He also wrote down the prices of more expensive items such as a laptop and television.  He was eager to show his Dad what he had written down.

Developing Number Sense: How Much Money Does It Take to Purchase Different Items

Doing an exercise such as the Walmart trip activity is a simple way to make math more fun for your child.  Children love the idea of spending one on one time with you anyway, so this is a great way to spend some one on one time with your child while also helping him to gain a better sense of the sizes of numbers.

Helping your child become good at math involves laying a solid foundation.  There are certain crucial things that a child must learn.  Helping your child develop a great number sense has to be a part of that solid foundation.  You can incorporate simple, fun things to reinforce things they have been taught.  Make it a habit to do at least one thing each week to make learning math a little more fun for your child.  Make your child eagerly anticipate what next you’ll do with him to make math more fun!

Reluctant math learner?

5 tips to get your reluctant learner excited about math %283%29

Got a reluctant math student? Turn your child that shies away from math into one who asks to do math activities! Download your free tip sheet today.

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit

Recent Posts
Showing 3 comments
  • Alexandra Derry
    Reply

    I love this post, thank you for sharing you way of teaching number sense! I could use this knowledge!

  • Alexandra Derry
    Reply

    I love this Post, thank you for sharing your way of teaching number sense! I could use this knowledge for teaching in our homeschool.

    • Shenek Alston
      Reply

      Thanks for stopping by my blog! I hope you find many resources here to help you. Any suggestions on what you’d like to see are welcomed. 🙂

Leave a Comment

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt

Start typing and press Enter to search

STEM Book: Ada Twist Scientist| Make Math More Fun for KidsSTEM Activity: Introduce Your Kids to Engineers